Treme

Title

Treme

Format

Video

Subject

Treme before and after the interstate was built

Description

This video explains how an urban renewal project wiped out an area that was once booming with business.

Creator

Kennedy Jeffery

Source

My Nola, My Story

Publisher

Mass Communications Department at Xavier University of Louisiana

Date

May 6, 2021

Contributor

Kennedy Jeffery

Rights

My Nola, My Story

Relation

My Nola, My Story 2021

Language

English

Type

Video

Coverage

A Digital Humanities project by Xavier University of Louisiana's Mass Communication department students, led by Shearon Roberts.

Original Format

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4CS-6aNTUrY

Transcription

Hi my name is Kennedy Jeffery, and I'll be presenting My Nola, My Story: The Story of Treme. Treme is one of the oldest neighborhoods in the city of New Orleans, and it is historically African American and it is also home to the first civil rights movement, the first black daily newspaper and a multitude of black businesses. Back in the 1700's it was the primary location for free people of color in new orleans. Slaves would gather in the neighborhoods town square, congo square. In the square they would dance and sell handmade goods in hopes to raise enough money to purchase their freedom. After the slaves were freed it was used more for holding concerts and gatherings. Many jazz musicians got their start in Treme because of all the brass and symphonic bands that would play in the square. During the 1960's, the city of New Orleans started working on an urban renewal project. With this project came the building of the i-10 highway. In order to do this, the city had to wipe out several properties running along Claiborne Street from Tulane to St. Bernard. After the interstate was built the hundreds of businesses that once lined North Claiborne were shut down due to the financial crisis that ensued. The majority of the large oak trees that once lined the neutral ground were chopped down. Originally the interstate was planned to be built in front of Jackson Square by Canal Street, but residents of the French Quarter fought against the plans until they were changed. Residents of Treme also opposed the plans for the interstate to be built in their neighborhood because they knew it would wipe out all the businesses, but the city did not listen to them
Today the memory of what was once there is kept alive by the few businesses that remain and the oak trees that were painted on the cement pillars under the interstate.

Duration

2:23 (2 minutes 23 seconds)

Producer

Kennedy Jeffery

Director

Kennedy Jeffery
Date Added
May 7, 2021
Item Type
Moving Image
Tags
, ,
Citation
Kennedy Jeffery, “Treme,” MY NOLA, MY STORY , accessed June 30, 2022, https://xulamasscomm.omeka.net/items/show/152.